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Child Travel Authorization Form Canada

Child Travel Authorization Form Canada

Permission to Travel with Children

  • Your children and babies need their own passports.
  • Extra documents may be required such as birth certificate which shows who the child’s legal parents are. If one parent is deceased; you may need to bring a death certificate.
  • If you are travelling without the other parent, you may need a legal document showing you have sole custody of your child, a Court Order that grants you permission to travel with the child or a Parental Consent Letter (see Sample Travel Authorization below).
  • Click here for SAMPLE Travel Authorization for Children Travelling Abroad with Third Party. This is a sample only. It does not guarantee travel–you may need to seek legal advice in this regard. You need to have it signed in front of a lawyer who can notarize it and offer legal advice, if required. You may need to modify this sample to suit your specific needs.
  • Unable to get the consent of the other parent to travel? Contact our office for your free consultation.
  • For Notary Services or Information on Obtaining a Court Order (Calgary Residents only) granting you permission to travel with your children without the consent of the non-travelling parent, contact: 403-229-2774.

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9 responses to “Child Travel Authorization Form Canada”

  1. Denise says:

    Do single parents, separated from father of child need permission for travel within Canada if that child & parents are Canadian citizens? The child has a signed passport from the father. They are separated, never married.

    • deborahw says:

      You may have challenges if you do not have a signed notarization letter from the father confirming travel from the parent. You’ll need either the notarized letter or possibly an order from the court permitting travel if you can not get the notarized letter. Border guards may be less concerned about this type of paperwork if the child is, say 16 yrs old vs 2 years old.

  2. Wendy says:

    Travel.gc.ca says:

    “We strongly recommend that children travelling abroad carry a consent letter proving they have permission to travel from every person with the legal right to make major decisions on their behalf, if that person is not accompanying the children on the trip. For example, children travelling alone, with groups or with only one custodial parent should travel with a consent letter. The purpose of a consent letter is to facilitate the travel of Canadian children while preventing their wrongful removal to foreign countries.”

  3. Macy says:

    does the child need a consent letter when returning to Canada?

    • deborahw says:

      Its good to have a Notarized letter detailing travel away from and back to Canada. But, I’m not sure a parent and child would be denied entry to Canada if the parent and child have lawful status in Canada–meaning I do not see how they could deny. But, they may take extra precaution to ensure the child is not somehow being abducted, if for example, the child has status in more than one country. Therefore, though it is generally up to the border guard, it is always best to travel with a Notarized letter or recent court order proving you are able to travel without authorization.

  4. Amanda says:

    I have no way to locate the father of my 11 year old. I have full custody from 2003 with visitation at my discretion, but have not seen him since 2007. I have been married since 2004 to another man with whom I share parentship with my second son, age 8. We cross the border frequently to shop as a family and have never had issues, but now we want to fly. What do I do?

    • deborahw says:

      Full custody as in sole custody? If you have sole custody, you should be able to apply for a Passport for your son without your son’s father’s consent. Please contact your nearest passport office for assitance in getting a passport for your son.

      • Amanda says:

        Thanks for your reply, but as stated in my question we already cross the border frequently (as in, he has a passport). They now want me to provide written consent from his father in order to cross, but I don’t know where he is. Thanks anyway, though!

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